Jane Austen

"Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way."
"Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken."
"There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense."
"From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry."
"In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you."
"For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?"
"I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other."
"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife."
"The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid."
"What are men to rocks and mountains?"
"I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library."
"Indeed, I am very sorry to be right in this instance. I would much rather have been merry than wise."